DEPARTMENT OF TECHNOLOGY

SYLLABUS
COMPUTER INFORMATION SYSTEMS 2033

CATALOG LISTING:  2033 FUND OF SYSTEMS ANALYSIS & DESIGN, 3 hours credit
An in-depth study of the Systems Development Life Cycle (SDLC) to include study, design development, and operation phases.  A total quality management emphasis is stressed and computer-assisted systems engineering (CASE) tools are introduced.  A project is required to show understanding of topics presented.  Lecture 3 hours.  Prerequisite:  CIS 1013 and CIS 1063.

EXPANDED COURSE DESCRIPTION:
Required course for data processing and CIS majors.  Students should develop an appreciation for the large amount of time that must be spent in designing a system before programming can begin.
 

Upon completion of the course students should:PROGRAM OBJECTIVE:
....understand and apply basic ethical behavior in an IT center environment SLO1
....have a detailed understanding of the major steps that take place in a system development project SLO2
....be able to interpret information from various sources and suggest possible solutions SLO5
....be able to use various system analysis tools including Gantt charts, PERT charts, and system flow charts SLO2,5

TEXT #1: Shelly and Cashman, Systems Analysis and Design, 7th edition  TEXT #2: MS-OFFICE PROJECT 2002-2003 

CREDIT:  Three hours upon successful completion of course.

EXAMS
Exams for this course will consist mainly of short answer essays, definitions, problems and a small amount of objective type questions.  The student is expected to be able to think logically and respond to questions with well written answers.

ATTENDANCE POLICY
All students are expected to attend class and to arrive on time.  Make-up for an exam to be missed must be approved before the scheduled time of the exam.  Make-up exams will be given at the convenience of the instructor and may be more difficult than the regular exam.  All assignments/projects are to be turned in at the beginning of the class period on the date due or they are worth 0 points.  All assignments/projects must be turned in or a grade of F will be given in the course.

WRITING ASSIGNMENTS:
   I. WRITING ASSIGNMENT  -- MEMORANDUM
       EXPLANATION:  According to Herman Weisman (BASIC TECHNICAL WRITING 5th edition) 
       the memo is the most common form of written communication in business and industry. 
       The memo is most often used for communication within an organization.
       CLASS ASSIGNMENT:  Various memos will be required throughout the semester.
       EVALUATION:   Memos will be graded for format, content, grammar, spelling, and the ability
        to communicate.
       AUDIENCE: As assigned by instructor

  II. WRITING ASSIGNMENT -- GANTT charts and PERT charts
       EXPLANATION:  Systems analysts have many tools available to help organize and manage
        systems projects.  Two of the most often used tools are the Gantt chart and the PERT chart.
       CLASS ASSIGNMENT:  Students develop individual charts to manage their system project for
        the semester.
       EVALUATION:  Charts will be graded for neatness and thoroughness.
       AUDIENCE:  Data Center Management and user department

  III. WRITING ASSIGNMENT  -- SYSTEM ANALYSIS PROJECT
       EXPLANATION:  The main job of a systems analyst is to investigate a problem and then to
       design a solution.  This design is typically a document that is passed through management channels
       to a separate division of the organization for actual system development and implementation.  The
       design must be prepared in such a way that the development step can be accomplished with little 
       or no contact with the analyst that did the design preparation.
       CLASS ASSIGNMENT:  Each student is required to complete a systems analysis project during
       the semester.
       EVALUATION:  The project will be graded for neatness, thoroughness, ability to solve the
       problem, and ability to be passed to the development staff for continuation.
       AUDIENCE: Data Center Management and user department

STUDENT HONESTY AND INTEGRITY