ISC Exams

School of Business Exams

Accounting: The test will be objective in nature and will not relate to any particular accounting text. Students should be familiar with accounting terminology and all steps in the accounting cycle including adjusting and closing entries. Other selected topics such as basic inventory methods, depreciation, and interest calculations will also be covered. Hand held calculators will be allowed. A minimum score of 70% must be achieved in order to be eligible for awards.

Business Law: Students must be either currently enrolled in Business Law or have had business law within the last academic year. The test will cover the legal system in general, contract law, Article Two of the Uniform Commercial Code (Sale of Goods), using credit, and commercial paper. A minimum score of 70% must be achieved in order to be eligible for awards.

Economics: Students must be currently enrolled in a business or economics course. The test will be an objective one-hour exam encompassing all major areas of economics. A minimum score of 70% must be achieved in order to be eligible for awards.

Introduction to Business: Students must be currently enrolled in a business course. The test will cover current issues, problems, and practices of the free enterprise system and the businesses that operate within it. The primary focus will be the American free enterprise system, but the impacts of global systems and competition may also be considered. The test will not relate to any particular text, but reading business magazines and newspapers is recommended. A minimum score of 65% must be achieved in order to be eligible for awards.

School of Education & Behavioral Sciences Exams

Advanced Home Economics/Human Ecology: (Type I & II) The advanced home economics/human ecology test is designed for juniors and seniors in high school. It has been developed from the knowledge base information according to the American Association of Families and Consumer Economics. In order to receive recognition, a student must score in the 60 percentile or above.

Kinesiology, Health & Wellness: The Kinesiology, Health & Wellness test is a 100 item multiple choice exam. Content is based upon knowledge of terminology, principles, and concepts in the areas of fitness, activity-based sports and exercises, and health and wellness. Minimum score for ranking is 70%.

Psychology: Students must have completed or be currently enrolled in a psychology course. The psychology test is a 100 item multiple choice test. The student can be ranked only if he/she scores 60 or above.

School of Liberal Arts Exams

Advanced English: Open to eleventh and twelfth grade students. The test will consist of approximately 100 items grouped into six sections: 1.) recognition of synonyms, antonyms, and analogous relationships - A is to B as _ is to _; 2.)recognition of effective coordination, subordination, and logical construction; 3.) recognition of errors in sentence mechanics - comma splices, fused sentences, fragments, and subject-verb & pronoun-antecedent agreement; 4.) recognition of effective sentences in terms of word choice, shifts, conjunctive devices, parallel structure, and pronoun usage; 5.) identification of logical fallacies; 6.) recognition of expository patterns and the components of effective paragraphs. The minimum acceptable score on this test will be a fifty (50).

American History: This examination consists of 100 multiple choice questions. The material covered begins with colonization and ends in themed-1980's. Examination questions concentrate on political and diplomatic events. Minimum score: 60.

American Literature: This examination consists of 100 true/false, multiple choice, and matching questions on American authors and their work as well as on some general characteristics of the major periods of American Literature. The minimum acceptable score on this test will be fifty (50). 

Drawing: Theme of the competition: "A Surreal Environment." A creative arrangement of juxtaposed objects which are rendered in a realistic manner indicating an understanding of illusion and atmospheric perspective. Composition: The drawing must contain a paper airplane, fruit, and a bird combined with an imaginary environment. Drawings should reflect excellent perceptual and technical skills and to include the use of light and dark values throughout the composition. Awards: First Place: $100.00, Second Place: $50.00, and Third Place: $25.00. Official Interscholastic Competition Information: 9:30 am-receive instructions: 9:40- begin drawing; 11:15 am- end drawing. Awards announced at12:00 noon. Materials furnished by Cameron: Paper only. Materials furnished by student: Please bring your drawing pencils, eraser, and a large 18 x 24 drawing board. Students will be using horse benches, not tables. Contest is in the Art Building. If you have any questions, please call Monika Linehan (580) 581-2450 or 581-2451.

English 2: Entrants must be currently enrolled in tenth grade English. The test includes questions on functional and descriptive grammar, spelling and punctuation, dictionaries and library reference materials, as well as a literature section with questions on "classics" for class study, young adult books, figurative language and poetic mater, and the characteristics of literacy form. The minimum acceptance score on the test will be fifty (50).

English Literature: Test consists of 100 true/false, multiple choice, and matching questions on English authors and their works grouped as follows: 1) Old English Period (8) items; 2) Middles English (9); 3) Renaissance (12); 4) 17th and 18th centuries and English Novel (24); 5) Romantic and Victorian Ages (20); 6) Modern Age (7); 7) recognition of terms of figurative language in poetry (8); 9) general questions on drama (5). The minimum acceptable score on this test will be fifty (50).

French I: Test consists of vocabulary and grammar covered in the first year of high school French. The minimum acceptable score is 70%.

French II: Test consists of vocabulary and grammar covered in the second year of high school French. The minimum acceptable score is 70%.

Advanced French: Test consists of vocabulary and grammar covered in the first three years of high school French. The minimum acceptable score is 70%.

Native French: Test consists of vocabulary and grammar used by educated people whose home language is French. The minimum acceptable score is 70%.

Geography: The examination consists of 100 multiple choice questions. The material covered includes questions dealing with physical, economic, human and world regional geography.

German I: Test consists of vocabulary and grammar covered in the first year of high school German. The minimum acceptable score is 70%.

German II: Test consists of vocabulary and grammar covered in the second year of high school German. The minimum acceptable score is 70%.

Advanced German: Test consists of vocabulary and grammar covered in the first three years of high school German. The minimum acceptable score is 70%.

Native German: Test consists of vocabulary and grammar used by educated people whose home language is German. The minimum acceptable score is 70%.

Spanish I: Test consists of vocabulary and grammar covered in the first year of high school Spanish. The minimum acceptable score is 70%.

Spanish II: Test consists of vocabulary and grammar covered in the second year of high school Spanish. The minimum acceptable score is 70%.

Advanced Spanish: Test consists of vocabulary and grammar covered in the first three years of high school Spanish. The minimum acceptable score is 70%.

Native Spanish: Test consists of vocabulary and grammar used by educated people whose home language is Spanish. The minimum acceptable score is 70%.

Impromptu Speaking: Each speaker will draw three topics, from which he/she will select one. Topics will be of a proverb or famous quotation nature. The student will have a total of four minutes in which to prepare and deliver a speech based on the topic drawn. Notes composed after topic selection are permitted. Timing commences with the acceptance of the topic sheet. If the time exceeds four minutes, the speech tournament director will drop the contestant one ranking point from each judge.

Instrumental Solo Competition:

  • Students should choose an instrumental solo they can perform (brass, percussion, strings, or woodwind). Performing time shall not exceed six minutes. Composition may not be cut except for dot repeats including first ending.
  • Each student must have a copy of their composition for the judge. Neither the name of the teacher nor the student should appear on the music.
  • The decision of the judge is final.

Monologue: Each contestant should be a full-time student at the high school they are representing. Each contestant will perform one (1) monologue. It should be no longer than four (4) minutes. If the student exceeds four minutes, the Theater Tournament Director will drop the contestant one ranking point from each judge. The monologue should be from a published play script. No original pieces will be accepted. The introduction should include only the following: The actor's name, the character they are playing, the playwright and the play. The monologue will be judged on the following criteria: Introduction, memorization, general comprehension of script, emotion line, relaxation, use of pause, and natural reaction. A minimum score of 70 is needed in order to be ranked.

Monologue Scoring:

  • Introduction (5 points)
  • Memorization (10 points)
  • Diction/accent (10 points)
  • Projection (10 points)
  • Vocal Variation (10 points)
  • Physical Variation (15 points)
  • General Comprehension of Script (5 points)
  • Emotional Line (10 points)
  • Relaxation (8 points)
  • Use of pause (10 points)
  • Natural Reaction 10 points)

TOTAL SCORE:

Newspaper Fundamentals: Open to freshmen, sophomores, juniors, and seniors. This test will consist of 50 multiple choice questions based on information provided in Reporting for the Media, 7th edition by Fred Fedler, John Bender, Lucinda Davenport, and Michael W. Drager. The minimum acceptable score for the test is 70%.

Piano Solo Competition:

  • Students should choose a piano solo they can perform by memory. Performing time shall not exceed seven minutes. Composition may not be cut except for dot repeats including first ending. A 10 second warm-up is allowed once the performer is seated at the piano before the audition performance.
  • Each student must have a copy of each composition for the judge. Neither the name of the teacher, nor the name of the student should appear on the music. Reproductions of published music should not be used.
  • The decision of the judge is final.
  • Students will be judged in three groups of two students per grade: 9th grade, 10th grade, 11th grade, and 12th grade.

Sociology: The sociology test contains 50 multiple choice questions. The test covers major concepts, terminology, and theories in the discipline of Sociology. Many of the questions ask the contestant to recognize the association between a major theorist and his or her theory. All of the questions are designed to be "textbook neutral." By "textbook neutral" we mean that any major introductory textbook in sociology should contain enough information for the student to answer all of most of the questions on the test. Minimum score for ranking is 70%.

United States Government: This test is designed to measure knowledge of the basic philosophy, institutions, processes and policies of U.S. national government. Questions concerning philosophical foundations will address the Declaration of Independence., Federalist #10, and the Gettysburg address. Questions on institutions will cover Congress, Presidency, Supreme Court, and federal bureaucracy. Questions concerning governmental processes will include public opinion, political parties, the media, interest groups, and campaigns and elections. The test is composed of fifty multiple choice questions.

Vocal Music Competition:

  • Students should choose a vocal solo that they can perform by memory. Suggested repertoire includes Old English songs, Classical Italian, Romantic Art songs, or Contemporary Art songs. Performing time shall not exceed seven minutes. Compositions may not be cut except for dot repeats including first endings.
  • Each student must have a copy of each composition for the judge. Neither the name of the teacher or the student should appear on the music. Reproductions of published music shall not be used.
  • A student should have his own accompanist. However, if the student wishes to sing with a taped accompaniment he should bring his own tape player and have the tape ready to begin at the appropriate place. Excessive length of time due to technical problems with the tape of tape player will disqualify the student from consideration. THERE WILL NOT be a tape player available other than those that the individual student brings with them.
  • The decision of the judge is final.
  • Students will be judged in four groups: 9th grade, 10th grade, 11th grade and 12th grade.

World History: This examination consists of 100 multiple choice questions. The material covered begins with ancient times and ends in the mid-1980's. Examination questions concentrate on political and diplomatic events. Minimum score: 60.

Yearbook Fundamentals: Open to freshmen, sophomores, juniors, and seniors, this test will consist of 50 multiple choice questions based on Columbia Scholastic Press Association's Scholastic Yearbook Fundamentals, 3rd edition. The minimum acceptable score for the test is 70%.

School of Science & Technology Exams

Advanced Biology: Open to students in 11th grade and above. Areas which may be included in test: Cell structure and function, genetics, evolution, organism diversity, ecology and the scientific method. Minimum qualifying score for ranking is 80%.

Advanced Chemistry: The chemistry exam is a multiple choice examination covering material from atomic theory, structure and hybridization, molecular structure, and molecular bonding, stoichiometry, thermodynamics, equilibrium and base behavior, electrochemistry, unit conversions, empirical and molecular formulas, molarity, and colligative properties. The students should be familiar with the basic formulas and units of measure (especially SI units) commonly encountered in these areas of chemistry. Students may use scientific calculators (except for those that have alphanumeric capabilities and/or pre-programmed formulas) during the examination.

Algebra II: The Algebra II exam consists of approximately 46 multiple choice questions. Graphing calculators will be allowed, but not required. The topics covered by this exam are normal topics covered in a second year high school algebra course and include: exponential and logarithmic functions, radicals, absolute values, systems of equations and inequalities, conic sections, polynomial function, complex numbers, matrices and determinants. The minimum score a student must make to be a finalist is 23.

Anatomy and Physiology: Open to all high school students. Areas which may be included in test: structure and function of human body tissues, organs, and systems.

Chemistry: The chemistry exam is a multiple choice examination covering material from atomic theory, structure and hybridization, molecular structure and molecular bonding, stoichiometry, unit conversions, empirical and molecular formulas, molarity, and colligative properties. The students should be familiar with the basic formulas and units of measure (especially SI units) commonly encountered in these areas of chemistry. Students may use scientific calculators (except for those that have alphanumeric capabilities and/or pre-programmed formulas) during the examination.

Computer Literacy: Offered by the Department of Technology, this exam is designed to test student knowledge of concepts and terms relative to computer information systems, data processing, systems analysis, hardware/software, computer languages, etc. This is not a programming test, but rather a general computer literacy exam. It is recommended that students either have completed or are currently enrolled in a computer course. Only students scoring at least 80% will be considered for winning places. Specific questions have been selected for use to break ties.

Computer Science: The computer science test is open to any student who is familiar with at least one high level programming language. Test questions which deal with programming topics are expressed in a pseudo language similar to Pascal. The examination assumes some familiarity with each of the following concepts:

  • Data representation (character, integer, float)
  • Number bases
  • Decision structures (if, case, statements)
  • Loop Structures (while, for, repeat)
  • Sorting techniques and their characteristics
  • Searching techniques and their characteristics
  • Basic information on binary tree structures
  • Program tracing

The current exam is approximately 25 questions in length. The use of scientific calculators (no programmable/graphing calculators) is allowed, since some of the problems require it. High scores for type I schools usually fall in the interval 12-16 while type II schools are usually in the interval 10-13. The median score for both types of schools is around 8. The minimum score a student can make to be a finalist is 10.

General Biology: Open to all high school students. Areas which may be included in the test: cell structure and function, genetics, evolution, organismic diversity, ecology and the scientific method. Minimum qualifying score for ranking is 80%.

Geometry: Geometry entrants must be currently enrolled in Euclidean Geometry or have completed Euclidean Geometry. This test includes questions on plane and solid geometry. Topics covered are definitions, axioms, theorems, proof, application problems, relationships, and formulas. The minimum score a student must make to be a finalist is 23.

Multimedia Design: Open to 10th grade and above. Areas which may be included in the test: definition of multimedia, basic multimedia terms, history of multimedia, technologies involved in multimedia development, project development, flowcharting, storyboarding, screen design, basic learning and teaching principles, instructional design, editing text, developing graphics, basic html, animating with Macromedia Flash and basic 3D terminology.
Part 1 - Participants take basic examination.
Part 2 - Mini lecture and demonstration of multimedia animation by Cameron professor.
Part 3 - Participants will create and present a computer animation with text, graphics, and audio provided by Cameron Multimedia department. The Multimedia Department at Cameron will provide a site that learners will be advised to visit for information.

Physics: The exam covers topics from the following areas of physics: motion (kinetics and dynamics), work-energy, momentum, thermal physics, waves, electricity and magnetism, light and optical devices, and atomic physics. Students should know the fundamental laws, units of measure (especially the SI) for the most important physical quantities, the important formulas, and how to use algebra to solve problems. The test is multiple choice and designed so that only one answer is correct. Students may use scientific calculators (that do not have alphanumeric capability and do not have pre-stored formulas) while taking the exam. Minimum score for ranking is 60%.

Trigonometry: Trigonometry test consists of 50 multiple choice problems. The use of scientific calculators (no programmable/graphing calculators) and trigonometric tables is allowed, since some of the problems require it. Students are responsible for their own calculators and batteries. None will be furnished during the exam. This test includes questions on evaluation of trigonometric functions and their inverses, solutions of triangles, polar coordinates, complex numbers, and trigonometric identities. The minimum score a student must make to be a finalist is 15.